Installing the Sleeve Lining–Old School

Readers,

The word “vent” is followed by “spleen” or “frustration” with some frequency, and I know why.

I spent yesterday afternoon trying to line my sleeve vents neatly the “old school” way following Kenneth King’s instruction in his Smart Tailoring DVD set. And while my first attempt was successful–after a fashion–it wasn’t pretty.

My first lined sleeve vent. Well, it can only get better, right?

My first lined sleeve vent. Well, it can only get better, right?

Apparently there is widespread aversion to lining sleeve vents among even professional sewers.

The sleeves started out innocently enough. Who could know what evil lurked within?

The sleeves started out innocently enough. Who could know what evil lurked within?

Checking some of my home sewing library sources I found only one–Vintage Couture Tailoring, by Thomas von Nordheim— that gave any instruction for lining sleeve vents specifically, as opposed to jacket and skirt vents.

Align the opened seams of the lining with the sleeve.

Align the opened seams of the lining with the sleeve.

Von Nordheim writes,

If you have a working vent construction, as in this jacket [used as the demonstration project in this book], the finishing at the hem is not quite as straightforward. Some Givenchy couture jackets in the author’s collection have fake vents, meaning the vent and blind buttonholes are only done in the shell fabric, but the lining is finished in a straight line around the hem as described. This could be considered a shortcut and not really acceptable in fine bespoke tailoring. Although rarely used, a vent and buttonholes on a sleeve should be made to work.

It does seem odd to bother making a vented sleeve and then use a cylindrical lining that almost entirely covers that lovely mitered overlap.

A running stitch secures the lining to the sleeve, so there's no problem with twisting.

A running stitch secures the lining to the sleeve, so there’s no problem with twisting.

We no longer live in the time when surgeons had vented sleeves so they could unbutton and roll them up in an instant to keep working while continuing to be properly attired.  (Where did I ever hear this explanation of vented sleeves, and is it even true?)

The running stitch starts about 6 inches down from the top of the seam and ends about 4 inches from the bottom.

The running stitch starts about 6 inches down from the top of the seam and ends about 4 inches from the bottom.

Who knows–maybe someday I will have a sink full of dirty dishes to wash when I’m wearing this “McCall Mannish Jacket,” and a bespoke tailor will be passing through the kitchen just as I unbutton and fold back my sleeves and plunge my bared forearms into the suds. The bespoke tailor will notice my beautifully lined vents and say, “Nice work–Gieves and Hawkes?”

Then I’ll wake up.

The underlap lining is stitched in before the overlap lining.

The underlap lining is stitched in before the overlap lining.

Well, if ever I should be in such a situation, I’d like to be prepared. So I gave Kenneth’s instructions a try.

The really tricky part–the only tricky part for me–was judging exactly where to cut into the lining. If you have sewn a vent you know what I mean, and if you haven’t and never will, you probably don’t care to read a boring description by an inept amateur, so I’ll save us both time.

The lining for the overlap is fell stitched along the hem and pick stitched along the vent. I need more practice to make my stitches smaller and more regular.

The lining for the underlap is fell stitched along the hem and pick stitched along the vent. I need more practice to make my stitches smaller and more regular.

The important thing to know about sewing a vented sleeve is there’s this slash you make in the lining so it will turn back just so, and the lining lies neatly and beautifully flat in just the right place with no fiddling.

Kenneth’s lining didn’t just lie beautifully–it reclined languorously, like an odalisque.

Before slashing the lining, I pinned it in place on the overlap.

Before slashing the lining, I pinned it in place on the overlap.

He made it look easy. The camera came in for a super closeup. Kenneth found the place to cut to, marked it with a pin, positioned his tailors’ scissors, and made one decisive clip.

I watched this seconds-long section repeatedly, trying to divine how he knew where to cut into this lining. Once you cut, there is no uncutting, so I wanted a formula to follow.

You see, in the aptitude battery I took a few years back I scored low in the paper-fold test, which measures how well you can imagine and recollect…uh…marks on paper that are hidden by folds.

Now, you might not think imagining and recollecting marks on paper hidden by folds is an aptitude until you’re up against lining a sleeve vent. Then you will have wished you scored higher. Because you have to be able to grasp how the lining lies now and what will happen if you cut into the lining at this angle or that angle and which is the best angle.

I tried to simulate the situation with a piece of folded paper, which at least helped me avert a full-out blunder.

Using a paper mockup I tried to imagine where to slash and fold back the lining. This little exercise helped some.

Using a paper mockup I tried to imagine where to slash and fold back the lining. This little exercise helped some.

After staring at my sleeve lining for so long you would have thought I was trying a new meditation exercise, I made a tentative cut, an irrevocable decision.

I finally took the plunge, slashed the lining, and turned it under to cover the overlap--with so-so results.

I finally took the plunge, slashed the lining, and turned it under to cover the overlap–with so-so results.

It was not too bad.

Not too good, either.

The resulting lined vented sleeve lacks finesse, but I can only go up from there, right?

I had another sleeve to go, another chance at achieving excellence in vent-lining, but the spirit was not willing. I opted to slipstitch the lining in place temporarily.

Left: the vent is lined. Right: I slipstitched the lining temporarily. I will finish the vent properly under Kenneth's tutelage in July.

Left: the vent is lined. Right: I slipstitched the lining temporarily. I will finish the vent properly under Kenneth’s tutelage in July.

I’ll bring the sleeve, which should be attached to the jacket shortly, to Kenneth’s tailoring details class in Cleveland in July to get advice from the maestro himself.

Together we can roll up our sleeves and plunge into the task of lining to impress even the most meticulous bespoke tailor–or surgeon.

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One thought on “Installing the Sleeve Lining–Old School

  1. Paula, whew, this does look very, very tricky to me. It’s wonderful that you will be at the feet of the master soon to perfect this part of the process.! I know it sounds tacky but, just remember that the inside of the sleeves are only viewed by us! Wait…we are the worst critics of our own work anyway, aren’t we? I’m truly loving seeing you work on this jacket. Reminds me of my good friend who only bakes from scratch for anyone who also bakes from scratch! At 70 years old she’s decided the effort is worth it when the recipient knows what went into that final product. For others, bakery goods will suffice. Your efforts on the jacket are fully appreciated by those of us that have attempted custom tailoring in the past. Can’t wait to see you modeling!

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