Kenton Trimmings, London

Readers,

Ever since I took the Savile Row tailoring class at the Fashion and Textile Museum in London last year I wanted to check out a tailors’ supplier our teacher, Victoria Townsend, recommended. Frustratingly, I caught a bad cold after the class ended. The two days I had hoped to roam the city were spent in the flat sniffling and feeling sorry for myself.

“Oh well,” I said to myself, “I’ll visit Kenton Trimmings next time.”

“Next time” turned out to be this past Monday, when Jack and I were in London finishing up our Germany-England trip. After a coffee and pain au chocolat breakfast at the Paul bakery on Gloucester Road we went our separate ways: Jack, by train to Battle; and me, by Tube to 5 Mozart Street, postcode W10.

Fueled for the morning's excursion: coffee and a pain au chocolat.

Fueling the morning’s excursion: coffee and a pain au chocolat.

The neighborhood surrounding Queen’s Park station was new to me, so it was no surprise that even using my trusty London AZ I got turned around a couple of times .

Would I run into a burning building to save my London streetfinder? I just might.

Would I run into a burning building to save my London streetfinder? I just might.

At last I was on course to my destination. Clutching the AZ I strode down the street with the eagerness of a foxhound that has locked onto a scent.

From Queen's Park station to Mozart Street I got lost for a few minutes, but no matter.

From Queen’s Park station to Mozart Street I got lost for a few minutes, but no matter.

Maybe it was my yellow raincoat and spiffy new purple scarf, or maybe it was my look of determination that attracted the attention of a woman walking in my direction.

As she came within earshot, she shyly said to me, “You look great.” “Thank you!” I said, surprised and a little confused at this rare instance of English effusiveness.

“You remind me of a family member,” she said.

“I hope it’s a happy memory,” I answered. “It is,” she said, and walked away with a little smile.

Whether I reminded her of dotty Great Aunt Edna or the family’s beloved border collie I’ll never know. I left off pondering that question when I arrived at Mozart Street a couple of minutes later.IMG_9017 (460x345)

What I saw was not a commercial street so much as a residential street where a handful of businesses had set up shop. If Victoria hadn’t mentioned Kenton Trimmings, I never would have discovered this place on my own.IMG_9015 (460x345)But the fact that this shop served the tailoring elite was all I needed to know to put this place on my “must see” list.

Mozart Street appears to have mainly houses and flats.

Mozart Street appears to have mainly houses and flats.

I’d brought a swatch of tweed from my Smart Tailoring jacket project in case I found buttons to rival the ones I’d bought in Salzburg.  But buttons are not the main reason, I concluded, I would schlep to Mozart Street.IMG_9009 (460x345)IMG_9010 (345x460)

Kenton Trimmings, LondonNo, the main reason would be the tailoring canvases.

These canvases are destined for some of the finest tailored suits in the world.

These canvases are destined for some of the finest tailored suits in the world.

If only I could have been sure which ones I needed to achieve the right degree of crispness or body for a particular fabric and pattern, I would have stocked up. A curious thing has happened since I did my first Smart Tailoring jacket project: I’m now interested in the supporting roles canvases play, almost as much as the fabric that gets all the attention in the finished garment.

So here I was, in the midst of a sizable array of jacket underpinnings, and all I could do was voice my admiration to Glyn West, who owns the shop along with his sister, and ask about mail order.

Glyn West of Kenton Trimmings

Glyn West of Kenton Trimmings

He cut me a couple of generous-sized samples of popular choices to take home. One was EC3 body canvas, which is  medium weight and pliable.

IMG_9046 (460x419)Another sample was of IL3, a crisp canvas with 40 percent horsehair. I tried crushing it with one hand, and it recovered nicely.IMG_9045 (345x460)

For good measure Mr. West tossed in a curved trouser zipper, the likes of which I’d never seen before.

Have you ever heard of a curved zipper? I hadn't.

Have you ever heard of a curved zipper? I hadn’t.

And when I described trying to use a tailor’s thimble that was too big for me, he brought out this adjustable Japanese version for my consideration. IMG_9040 (345x460)IMG_9041 (345x460)IMG_9042 (460x371)I had never seen a thimble like this. What a clever idea!

For two pounds I had a little souvenir of Kenton Trimmings. It will tide me over till my next visit, when I plan to lay in a goodly supply of canvases.

After all, those jackets and coats I dream of making deserve the very best, don’t they?

Kenton Trimmings: worth a special trip.

Kenton Trimmings: worth a special trip.

This entry was posted in Field trips, Sewing supplies and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 thoughts on “Kenton Trimmings, London

  1. I want to kiss you for this post. I’m travelling to London for work in July and while I know some good places to buy fabrics didn’t know where to find good notions.

  2. Pingback: » Taylors Buttons, London Getting Things Sewn

Comments are closed.