McCall 4065, “Misses’ Mannish Jacket,” 1941

Readers,

A few days ago I had the jacket I’ve been making using Kenneth King’s Smart Tailoring DVDs properly lighted and photographed in my sister’s studio.IMG_6680 (460x386)

As you can see, I haven’t sewn the buttonholes or attached buttons yet.

What's left to do? Buttonholes, buttons, and a final press.

What’s left to do? Buttonholes, buttons, and a final press.

I’m pretty sure this fabric is old–possibly from the 1950s–judging from the shades of blues and greens that strike me as different from today’s.

What's going on here? The back vent is not hanging straight. Could pressing remedy this?

What’s going on here? The back vent is not hanging straight. Could pressing remedy this?

New buttons might look fine with this jacket, but wouldn’t it be wonderful to find vintage buttons with subtle shades that complement the coloring of this tweed and the style of this 1941 pattern?

A side view shows the upper and one of the lower patch pockets.

A side view shows the upper and one of the lower patch pockets.

And where better to conduct my search than London, home of mannish jackets and every sort of mannish jacket supplies? So when Jack and I get to London May 31, my quest will be uppermost in my mind.

The felt undercollar, fell stitched to the jacket body, looks nice.

The felt undercollar, fell stitched to the jacket body, looks nice.

The last time I was in London, for the Savile Row tailoring course at the Fashion and Textile Museum, I caught a cold and spent two days lying prostrate instead of dashing around checking out some new sewing and fashion sources, which was frustrating.

I like the way the upper collar wraps to the undercollar. I am wondering whether my sleeve cap is a little too filled out. I will ask Kenneth King when I take his class in July.

I like the way the upper collar wraps to the undercollar. I am wondering whether my sleeve cap is a little too filled out. I will ask Kenneth King when I take his class in July.

Fell stitching, close up. Here again I wonder whether I have put too much padding into the shoulder or sleeve cap.

Rookie fell stitching, close up. Here again I wonder whether I have put too much padding into the shoulder or sleeve cap.

I hope to visit those places this time, but as my sewing teacher Edith says, “You never know.” I may miss places I’d hoped to go to, yet discover other delightful places by sheer chance.

Here's the hidden pocket I learned to make. I think I'll put a hidden pocket into every lined jacket I make from now on.

Here’s the hidden pocket I learned to make. I think I’ll put a hidden pocket into every lined jacket I make from now on.

In a couple of hours Jack and I will leave for the airport. Our three-week trip will take us to a little town in Bavaria, Berlin (my first visit), Cambridge, and London.

The vent is...passable.

The vent is…passable. I was surprised to see how I made the underlap a little too long. I thought I had nailed this.

But the sleeve vent is not my finest work. I'll ask Kenneth how I can improve.

But the sleeve vent is not my finest work. I’ll ask Kenneth how I can improve.

We’re bringing the laptop, and barring technical difficulties, I plan to post during our travels.

Ready for takeoff!

Ready for takeoff!

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6 thoughts on “McCall 4065, “Misses’ Mannish Jacket,” 1941

  1. I’ve been watching this jacket come together with more than casual interest. You should be proud of the end result. I’m not sure about how to remedy the back vent, but wondered if you didn’t fold it back in line with the centre back seam. If this is the prob, pressing should help.

    • The problem might be as simple as not hanging the jacket correctly on the mannequin. That is my hope. I will certainly get to the bottom of this when I get back from my travels. The jacket could use a good pressing, and I want to ask Kenneth for pointers when I take his class in July. Thank you, Gail!

  2. Nice to see your jacket in its final stages! I’m wondering if the vent will hang straighter once buttoned? I have this pattern and I’m going to check the back piece to see if it looks like it may hang this way. Although you have made this jacket before, how do the others look?
    Have a wonderful time on your vacation!

    • That is a really good idea, Marguerite. There is a fair chance that the jacket is not hanging right on the mannequin. I am writing this from Germany (just arrived this morning) so I can’t scrutinize my other “mannish” jackets right now, but I think the vents do hang straight. Thank you for your suggestion. )And our first day here was very fun despite the jet lag.)

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