Mindful Entertainment

Readers,

The project I’m working on at the moment is so boring (a pants muslin) that I can hardly bear to write about it, much less take pictures of it.  Maybe a professional could style and light a pants muslin brilliantly, but I sure can’t.

Great-fitting pants: worth the effort to make, of course, but not exciting to write about.

Great-fitting pants: worth the effort to make, of course, but not exciting to write about.

The interesting part of sewing pants is, frankly, getting them done.  For my figure, simpler lines in skirts and pants work best. Jackets, vests, coats, tops, dresses, hats, and scarves allow much greater creative range and challenge for me.

To get through the boring parts of projects I like to take breaks by visiting the Vintage Patterns Wiki.  Browsing page after page of vintage pattern envelope illustrations is, I was going to say, mindless entertainment, but actually, it’s the opposite for me. It’s mindful entertainment: I have loads of fun looking at pictures intently and picking out the ones I like the most.

I copy and paste the images of my favorite pattern designs into a Microsoft OneNote notebook I set up for myself for wardrobe and sewing ideas, and add comments that are keyword-searchable.

In pants, simpler is better for me. Tops are where I put the distinctive details.

In pants, simpler is better for me. Tops are where I put the distinctive details.

I can impulsively add any pattern illustrations I like, and if I change my mind, delete them later. Over time I can see which patterns have staying power and whether they have common elements that suggest a wardrobe direction.

Recently I’ve been browsing vintage blouse patterns, to use great fabrics from my stash and to go with jackets I’ve made or am planning to make. What great choices the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s offered! And so many would fit effortlessly into today’s wardrobes.

Here are some of the blouses that caught my eye.  Long live Vintage Pattern Wiki!

1950s. Nice on its own or under a jacket.

1952. Nice on its own or under a jacket.

1952. A chance to use beautiful vintage buttons.

1952. A chance to use beautiful vintage buttons.

400px-Vogue900 (345x460)

1953. Vogue Couturier Design 774. The blouse has a simple shape but has that extra detail that makes it special. When I look at a design like this I think, “I’m glad I sew!” because  I can choose to make this.

1944. The masculine shoulder line of the war years is balanced by gathers and frills.

1944. The masculine shoulder line of the war years is balanced by gathers and frills.

1930s. The importance of a jacket without all the work of tailoring. Interesting collar/lapels, and a chance to use vintage buttons.

1930s. The importance of a jacket without all the work of tailoring. Interesting collar/lapels, and a chance to use vintage buttons.

1930s. It's less the blouse in this case as it's the high-waisted skirt that completes the ensemble that grabs me.

1930s. It’s not the blouse alone; it’s the combination with  the high-waisted skirt that I really like here.

1954. A convertible hood. I like the idea, but would this look good on me, or just strange?

1954. A convertible hood. I like the idea, but would this look good on me, or just strange?

1952. Vogue Paris Original Model 1162. The jacket is gorgeous, but Schiaparelli made the blouse a stunner, too.

1952. Vogue Paris Original Model 1162. The jacket is gorgeous, but Schiaparelli made the blouse a stunner, too.

1952. A nice way to bring the eye up.

1952. One way to bring the eye up.

1953. The diagonal stripes go in the other direction but also bring the eye up.

1957. Could this be a candidate for drapey knits as well as wovens?

1957. Could this be a candidate for drapey knits as well as wovens?

This entry was posted in Fashion and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.