Project: Vogue 4036 Jacket, (1959), Part 4

Readers,

I made another sample for this jacket, Vogue 4036, from 1959: the pocket and flap.IMG_5195 (345x460)I’m so used to misunderstanding instructions, making goofs, and starting over that I was surprised–shocked!–that the pocket and flap turned out so nicely on the first try.

Here are the printed instructions:IMG_5321 (460x226)

IMG_5323 (460x345)

IMG_5324 (460x149)

And here’s what I did:

Here's the part of the jacket front showing the dart, pocket, and flap placement.

Here’s the part of the jacket front showing the dart, pocket, and flap placement.

I didn't cut a whole jacket front--only a part. I underlined with a crisp cotton to give this loosely woven fabric body and stability.

I didn’t cut a whole jacket front–only a part. I underlined with a crisp cotton to give this loosely woven fabric body and stability.

The pocket piece.

The pocket piece.

Detail: the stitching and fold lines of the pocket.

Detail: the stitching and fold lines of the pocket.

The pocket, with the lines marked on both sides with some wonderful old tracing carbon found at an estate sale.

The pocket, with the lines marked on both sides with some wonderful old tracing carbon found at an estate sale.

The pocket is pinned to the front, aligning the stitching box with the one I traced onto the front.

The pocket is pinned to the front, aligning the stitching box with the one I traced onto the front.

This is what I mean: the pocket's stitching box is lined up with the one I drew on the front. This plain white underlining shows markings beautifully!

This is what I mean: the pocket’s stitching box is lined up with the one I drew on the front. This plain white underlining shows markings beautifully.

The stitching box, stitched.

The stitching box, stitched.

Hmmm...why didn't my boxes line up better? Well, no harm done.

Hmmm…why didn’t my boxes line up better? Well, no harm done.

Slash through all layers, making triangular ends.

Slash through all layers, making triangular ends.

Pull the pocket through the opening to the back. I assumed I should press the opening like a bound buttonhole, but no. Also, the markings faded when I pressed them. Re-marking the lines with chalk was not successful. But--no matter.

Pull the pocket through the opening to the back. I assumed I should press the opening like a bound buttonhole, but no. Also, the markings faded when I pressed them. Re-marking the lines with chalk was not successful. But–no matter.

The long cut edges are pressed toward the cut, not away, in preparation for the next step.

The long cut edges are pressed toward the cut, not away, in preparation for the next step.

The pocket is folded on the fold line, and the stitching line is supposed to line right on top of the previous stitching--the lower line of the box.

The pocket is folded on the fold line, and the stitching line is supposed to line right on top of the previous stitching–the lower line of the box.

The view from the right side.

The view from the right side.

The line is stitched now.

The line is stitched now.

I used contrast thread for this sample. My stitching should not be visible in any case. Now I think I could have stitched in the ditch and avoided this unsightliness. (And that's what I can learn from making samples!)

I used contrast thread for this sample. My stitching should not be visible in any case. Now I think I could have stitched in the ditch and avoided this unsightliness. (And that’s what I can learn from making samples!)

Catch the triangular ends into the stitching of the pocket.

Catch the triangular ends into the stitching of the pocket.

Done. (My stitching is not always so wobbly. I'm blaming the slippery lining.)

Done. (My stitching is not always so wobbly. I’m blaming the slippery lining.)

Warning: this pocket is small!

Warning: this pocket is small!

On to the flap:

The flap pattern piece, folded to its finished dimensions. Is it too big, or is it in keeping with the generous-sized collar?

The flap pattern piece, folded to its finished dimensions. Is it too big, or is it in keeping with the generous-sized collar?

Using part of an old file folder, I cut out a window to the dimensions of the finished flap. I marked vertical and horizontal center lines. Then I previewed various plaid layouts.

Using part of an old file folder, I cut out a window to the dimensions of the finished flap. I marked vertical and horizontal center lines. Then I previewed various plaid layouts.

Another layout choice.

Another layout choice.

I'm going with this choice.

I’m going with this choice.

I laid the pattern piece on top of the preview window, aligning the vertical and horizontal pencil lines. Then I slipped the preview window out of the way, and cut the flap.

I laid the pattern piece on top of the preview window, aligning the vertical and horizontal pencil lines. Then I slipped the preview window out of the way, and cut the flap.

I interfaced the flap with the same crisp woven used in the jacket front mockup.

I interfaced the flap with the same crisp woven used in the jacket front mockup.

The flap is stitched, leaving an opening for turning. Then the usual seam-trimming, turning, pressing, and slipstitching the opening closed.

The flap is stitched, leaving an opening for turning. Then the usual seam-trimming, turning, pressing, and slipstitching the opening closed.

The flap is slipstitched right above the pocket opening. Be careful not to catch the pocket fold in the the slipstitching.

The flap is slipstitched right above the pocket opening. Be careful not to catch the pocket fold in the the slipstitching.

The flap is not meant to be centered over the pocket.

The flap is not meant to be centered over the pocket.

Done. I like it!

Done. I like it!

And it works!

And it works!

Another step closer to this.

Another step closer to this.

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4 thoughts on “Project: Vogue 4036 Jacket, (1959), Part 4

  1. Beautiful work! But weren’t you tempted to make the pocket as big as the flap? What are those dinky pockets for, anything? A lace handkerchief?

    • A small lace handkerchief, at that. I do love pockets, and this size can barely handle one lipstick. Okay, I’ll see how much bigger I can go. I was just being lazy when I made the sample.

  2. I really like this pocket technique. I think that the positioning of the flap is to hide any bit of the pocket from showing. Usually a flap is inserted into the bound opening. This seems like a very couture method, especially with the hand sewn flap. You may be able to widen the opening a half inch but I would stop there.

    • You’ve got me wondering, Marguerite, what qualifies a method as “couture.” I just realized that my attitude was that if I can do it, it can’t be couture, because couture is beyond my abilities. But–perhaps not! That’s a cheering thought! A new frontier is opening up!

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