Button Storage Problems Solved!

Readers,

The bags I’d ordered last week in the hopes that they’d solve my button-storage quandaries arrived yesterday from Paper Mart.

A case of 1000 recloseable bags arrived yesterday.

A case of 1000 recloseable bags arrived yesterday.

As I wrote recently, I had stored my many vintage buttons in Ziploc snack bags. True, the bags were portable and fairly see-through, but they were stored in boxes in a closet. Supplies that are out of sight are easy to forget. After a labor-intensive session of punching holes in those snack bags for hanging from pegboard hooks I conceded defeat and ordered these see-through, recloseable bags with “hang tabs,” as Paper Mart calls them.

It's a little harder to see button details through the snack bags than the new bags.

It’s easier to see button details through the new bag than through the old snack bags.

I practically tore open the box in my excitement to give my beautiful buttons new homes.

My first impressions are all positive.

The new bags are clearer than the Ziploc snack bags, so I can see button details better.

The storage area of the bags is the size of a standard 3″ by 5″ index card, large enough to hold all the multiples I have of one button style.

The storage area is the same dimensions as an index card: 3" by 5".

The storage area is the same dimensions as an index card: 3″ by 5″.

Removing the protective strip, folding over the end and pressing shut were all pretty easy. The opening stayed closed but was easy to open and reclose. Under normal conditions it doesn’t appear that the bags would break open.

Pull off the strip to reveal the sticky strip. Fold and press to close.

Pull off the strip to reveal the sticky strip. Fold and press to close.

I put several bags on a big ring I happened to have. I could see carrying buttons, buckles, and other decorative elements this way to a fabric store.

Carry to the fabric store, or hang on a hook at home.

Carry to the fabric store, or hang on a hook at home.

Wanting to see how strong the hang tab was, I pulled hard on a bag on the ring. The hang tab unit stayed intact, and  while it did tear off, the bag stayed sealed. I wouldn’t recommend subjecting these bags to a lot of strain, but they appear to be strong considering how light they are.

When I pulled hard, the bag tore, but it seems pretty sturdy under normal conditions.

When I pulled hard, the bag tore, but it seems pretty sturdy under normal conditions.

The hole in the hang tab easily fits over a pegboard hook.

I had a few extra pegboard hooks, which I hung in an instant. Moments later they were filled with bags of buttons or buckles.

In a few minutes I had created open storage for big part of my decorative stash.

In a few minutes I had begun creating open storage for big part of my decorative stash.

I also attached a couple of sheets of cork to my pegboard with heavy binder clips for a quick, cheap, and easy idea board. I pulled couple of swatches from my recent visit to New York’s Garment District, buttons, buckles, and some vintage French initial tape for a red, white and blue summer theme.

Swatches, buttons, buckles, initial tape for a quick idea board.

Swatches, buttons, buckles, initial tape for a quick idea board.

On second thought, I’ll keep the pegboard for what it does best: hang stuff. I’m going to try making space to hang all my buttons, buckles and trims even if some equipment has to be moved.Next to the pegboard is just enough space for a large bulletin board to try out combinations of swatches, pattern illustrations, buttons, buckles, trims and other inspirations.

Trying out ideas for my wardrobe has just gotten easier.

Trying out ideas for my wardrobe has just gotten easier.

I’d never thought before about making a brainstorming space just above the ironing board, but what a good place for one. Whether I’m ironing clothes or pressing a sewing project, I can let my mind wander from routine work to plan beautiful new possibilities.

Ironing just got more interesting.

Ironing just got more interesting.