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Readers,

The body of my 1941 McCall “Misses’ Mannish Jacket” is now lined, using the “old school” method in Kenneth King’s Smart Tailoring DVD set.

Firsts for me: installing the lining flat, without sleeves, by hand. I liked doing it this way.

Firsts for me: installing the lining flat, without sleeves, by hand. I liked doing it this way.

No machine work in this segment, and, I know this threatens to get repetitive, but I continue to like the hand stitching. With hand stitching I have the option of making adjustments stitch by stitch, if necessary, to see that the fabrics being joined lie naturally and don’t tug.

Pick stitching was easy and nice-looking.

Pick stitching was easy and nice-looking.

Plus, I don’t think machine stitching would have been any faster. If the choice comes down to more speed or more control, I’ll take control. That often means hand stitching.

The exposed, raw edge of that little stretch of facing is traditionally secured with catch stitches.

The exposed, raw edge of that little stretch of facing is traditionally secured with catch stitches.

Of course, I could use more practice, as I’ll be quick to admit. For educational purposes¬† I’m showing you my inelegant finish to the underlap of the vent. I have only myself to blame. As Oprah says, when you know better, you do better. Next time I’ll be more dexterous.

The underlap of the vent is trimmed to reduce bulk.

The underlap of the vent is trimmed to reduce bulk.

The lining is pinned in place along the vertical edge.

The lining is pinned in place along the vertical edge.

The top of the lining wraps around to the back to cover the raw edge. My best effort here. Sad, I know.

The top of the lining wraps around to the back to cover the raw edge. My best effort here. Sad, I know.

The top of the lining is pick stitched through to the overlap of the vent. Kenneth's result is smooth and tidy. Mine is--not.

The top of the lining is pick stitched through to the overlap of the vent. Kenneth’s result is smooth and tidy. Mine is–not.

The clumsy result is the reason why I resist cutting into my favorite fabrics when experimenting with techniques and patterns on the first go-round.

Kenneth’s explanations, as always, along with clear and complete closeups and zoom outs, made the work in this segment easy to execute.

There’s just one drawback, though. My project has all the drama of a cozy mystery.

The raw edges of the lining and hem are aligned. Then the lining folds down and there will be enough play to create what's called a "jump pleat."

The raw edges of the lining and hem are aligned. Then the lining folds down and there will be enough play to create what’s called a “jump pleat.” The lining is slipstitched to the hem.

But then I did say I wanted making jackets and coats to become no big deal. If it’s jeopardy I’m after, tailoring might not fill the bill anymore.

I think I can live with that.