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Readers,

The orange wool wearable test I’m doing before I make my leopard collar jacket has continued to come together nicely.

Taking shape nicely.

Taking shape nicely.

I made the upper collar-lining unit yesterday.  Then I pinned it to the under collar-jacket unit, and stitched the units together in one long seam.

The upper collar-lining unit is pinned to the under collar-jacket unit, ready for stitching.

The upper collar-lining unit is pinned to the under collar-jacket unit, ready for stitching.

Pinning and stitching this long seam is always exciting and a little suspenseful for me. I’ve done a lot of work up to this point. Then I stitch, press, and grade the long seam. There’s the moment when I turn my project right side out and see it transforming into a garment. Boy, do I need that moment!

On me, the jacket is shifting and looks rumpled because I haven't yet anchored all the parts.

On me, the jacket is shifting and looks rumpled because I haven’t yet anchored all the parts.

This practice run has gone so well that I just might finish it and wear it for real.

This jacket is as soft and rumpled as a shar pei puppy.

This jacket is as soft and rumpled as a shar pei puppy.

I’m going to take this just as it is to my next Coat Craze class at Treadle Yard Goods Nov. 2. I’m wondering about interfacing the sleeve and jacket hems, anchoring the two units so they don’t shift, and finishing attaching the lining.

I think the rumpling problems will be solved with additional interfacing, hemming topstitching for body and support and handstitching the neck seams together to stop the shifting.

I think the rumpling problems will be solved with additional interfacing, hemming topstitching for body and support and handstitching the neck seams together to stop the shifting.

While I wait for the next class, I can choose my next coat pattern to tackle.

Yes-more coats are coming!